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3 weeks ago · by · 0 comments

TURKEY FRYER SAFETY TIPS

As with any cooking tool, it’s important to take caution when using a turkey fryer as it can be extremely dangerous. Here are some tips to consider when frying a turkey:

  1. Stay in the area where you are cooking. Leaving the turkey unattended may cause the fryer to overheat, resulting in a fire.
  2. Use your turkey fryer on a level surface. Anything that might cause the fryer to tip over may result in a hot oil spill.
  3. Thaw your turkey before cooking. Water from a still-frozen turkey can cause the oil to bubble or splash over the pot.
  4. Keep small children and animals away from the fryer while it is in use. There is a great risk that a child or pet could run into the fryer, knocking it down and causing serious injury. A safe distance of three to 10 feet away is recommended.
  5. Have safety equipment ready. Use oven mitts, goggles and an apron while cooking. Have a fire extinguisher nearby in case of emergency, and keep flammable items away from the fryer.

Your Safety Matters!

For your safety, only use a turkey fryer outside and away from your home. Never use a turkey fryer in a garage or on a porch. Also, be sure to keep some distance between yourself and the fryer as you monitor it—you wouldn’t want to accidentally get splashed with hot oil.

Did You Know?

The U.S. Fire Administration states that Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires. While preparing your Thanksgiving turkey can be a timeless tradition, it’s important to keep cooking safety measures in mind to protect yourself, your guests and your home.

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2 years ago · by · 0 comments

Happy New Year!

new-year-2017-small

“As the year comes to a close, it is a time for reflection – a time to release old thoughts and beliefs and forgive old hurts. Whatever has happened in the past year, the New Year brings fresh beginnings. Exciting new experiences and relationships await. Let us be thankful for the blessings of the past and the promise of the future.” – Peggy Toney Horton

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2 years ago · by · 0 comments

Online Identity Theft Prevention

credit-card-1730085__340-smallGoing online has become part of everyday life, whether it is for everyday activities such as shopping, sending email or paying bills, and managing your accounts. But data breaches, in all their forms, can potentially expose the personal information that we share online, putting consumers at risk of identity theft.

According to the 2015 Travelers Consumer Risk Index, 59% of Americans worry about online identity theft. Fortunately, there are steps that consumers can take, including not opening unsolicited emails and avoiding unsecure websites, to protect their personal information while online.

The following tips can help you learn how to help stay safe online:

Online Shopping

  • Research potential retailers to make sure they are reputable and have a secure network and website. Try to avoid buying from a site that does not have a secure socket layer (SSL) encryption installed. In order to do this, look for the ‘s’ at the beginning of a URL – HTTPS:// instead of HTTP:// – to help determine if a site is SSL secured.
  • Read the site’s privacy policy to learn how the personal information you provide will be used.
  • Use only one credit card for online purchases. Be sure to read statements when received to check for fraudulent or unknown charges or activity.
  • If you receive an email regarding sales or discounts from a particular retailer, log on directly to the official website for the business. Avoid linking to it from an unsolicited email.

Emails and Attachments

  • Do not send personal information in email or instant messages. Emails are out of your control once sent, and can be easily intercepted.
  • Do not click on links you receive by email or encounter online that are suspicious or from unknown sources. Only accept and click if it:
    • Comes from someone you know.
    • Comes from someone you have received mail from before.
    • Is something you were expecting.
    • Does not look odd with unusual spellings or characters.
    • Passes your anti-virus program test.
  • Be cautious of emails you receive regarding your financial accounts. If you are not sure of the email’s validity, contact your financial institution directly.

General Online Safety

  • Try to limit the personal information you put on the Internet. Social media sites can be good for networking, but identity thieves can use the information you share.
  • Remember to keep your Web browser up to date. This can help ensure the latest security features are installed.
  • Avoid storing personal information, account numbers and personal identification numbers on your computer.
  • Install firewall and anti-virus software. This can help protect you from exposure to malicious cyber attacks.
  • Choose strong passwords and keep them private.

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2 years ago · by · 0 comments

Holiday Party Reminders & Religious Accommodation

009__8_Eggnog, latkes, old friends, parties – and a lot of beveraging! HR That Works wishes you a safe and happy holiday season! As the host of your company party, you have a legal obligation to make sure that attendees get home safe. Here’s our list of tips to help you meet this responsibility:

  • Make party attendance voluntary.
  • Hire bartenders trained to spot and handle intoxicated revelers.
  • Provide non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Give each guest a limited number of drink tickets, instead of an open bar.
  • Serve filling food – not just chips and pretzels – whenever alcohol is available.
  • Cut off alcohol service at least an hour before the party ends.
  • Stop serving intoxicated guests immediately; don’t wait until they’re ready to leave.
  • Never ask an apparently impaired guest if they’re able to drive home – they aren’t.
  • Provide a taxi service for guests who require or request it.
  • Have a friend or family member pick up intoxicated guests.
  • Arrange for discounted rooms at the event location or a nearby hotel.

Finally, have a fun party. Think like good ‘ol Mr. Fezziwig!

Accommodating Religious Needs

The holiday season is an ideal time to focus on religious accommodation in in the workplace. Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on religion. We’ve seen more of these claims in recent years, with thousands of claims filed in 2012. Unsurprising, many of these cases include allegations of discrimination based national origin (i.e. someone claims discrimination because they’re of Arab origin, as well as Muslim).

The EEOC offers this definition of “religion:”

“In most cases, whether or not a practice or a belief is religious is not an issue. However, the EEOC defines religious practices to include moral or ethical beliefs as to what’s right and wrong, which are sincerely held with the strength of traditional, religious views. The fact that no religious group espouses such beliefs, or that the religious group to which the individual professes to belong might not accept such belief, will not determine whether the belief is a religious belief of the employee or prospective employee. The phrase ‘religious practices’ includes both religious observances and practices.” Also, bear in mind that:

  • It’s unlawful for an employer to fail to accommodate reasonably the religious practices of an employee or prospective employee, unless the employer demonstrates that accommodation will mean undue hardship in conducting its business.
  • An employer may not ask about an employee’s religious background unless justified by business necessity.”

For more information on religious expression in the workplace, check out: 1) EEOC guidelines and FAQS on religious discrimination: 2) an EEOC memo on accommodating religious expression; and 3) religious accommodation practices at the University of Missouri ( a great education, period).

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Scurich Insurance Services
Phone: (831) 661-5697
Fax: (831) 661-5741

Physical:
783 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Suite7,
Aptos, Ca 95003-4700

Mailing:
PO Box 1170
Watsonville, CA 95077-1170

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(831) 661-5697

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