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1 month ago · by · 0 comments

To Bundle, or Not to Bundle

If you’ve ever shopped around for insurance, you’ve likely been asked if you want to bundle your policies—in other words, combine your home or renters, auto and life insurance policies with the same carrier. Although you have the option to shop around individually for each policy, it almost always makes sense to have the same carrier cover as many of your policies as possible.

Benefits of Bundling

  • The discount—Most policyholders bundle their policies because of the promise of a discount. The amount varies by provider but can generally range between 5-25 percent.
  • The option of a single deductible—With bundled policies, your deductible may be cheaper in the event of a claim that affects multiple policies. For example, if your home and auto policies are with two separate carriers, and a hailstorm damages your home and your car, you’re responsible for paying both your home and auto deductibles before receiving payment. But if you bundle your policies, your provider may offer you the option to pay only the higher of the two deductibles.
  • Less chance of being dropped—If you’ve made claims or gotten tickets, having your policies bundled with one provider can decrease the chance of them dropping you.
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When it Doesn’t Pay to Bundle

It isn’t always better to bundle your policies with one insurance carrier. Here’s when it may be better to split them up:

  • If you have tickets or past claims that make your auto insurance expensive—In this case, it may be cheaper overall to buy each policy from separate providers.
  • When premiums increase—Bundling discourages people from price shopping, which makes it easier for providers to increase their rates. Most assume that you won’t go through the effort of shopping around when your policies renew.
  • If policies aren’t technically bundled—Some carriers may insure you with an affiliated company. Although you may get a discount with that company, you’ll lose the convenience of paying your premium with one familiar provider.

A Few Tips to Consider

Although discounts are the main reason people bundle their insurance policies, never assume that bundling is the cheapest option. Your needs and circumstances will dictate whether you should combine your policies with one carrier. Consider the following tips:

  • Shop for new coverage when your policies renew, and ask for the price of the individual premiums as well as the price of the bundled premium so you can decide whether it is worth it. Just make sure you compare the same coverage when shopping for quotes from each carrier.
  • Ask if the provider uses a third-party insurance company. Remember that you may save money but lose the convenience of dealing with one provider and a combined bill.
  • Ask an independent insurance agent to get prices from multiple companies so you don’t have to do the legwork. An agent that is loyal to a particular carrier may be able to offer discounts that you can’t get alone.

With multiple factors contributing to the price of your insurance premiums, it is important to shop around in order to get the best rate for your insurance needs. Feel free to contact Scurich Insurance to determine if bundling is right for you and help you take advantage of all available discounts.

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6 months ago · by · 0 comments

Safety Footwear, the Right Shoe for the Job

Whether you stand all day, operate heavy machinery or handle chemicals, you need to protect your feet as you work. Several foot safety tips reduce injuries and help you maintain a safe work environment.

When to Wear Safety Footwear

Safety footwear protects your feet against numerous injuries, including punctures, impacts, electrical shock and compression. If you work in any hazardous work environment, you probably need to wear safety footwear as part of your daily uniform. Protective shoes also protect your feet if you suffer from weak ankles or other medical conditions.

Available Types of Safety Footwear

Depending on your job and preferences, you may select safety boots or sneakers. Available in a variety of styles and colors, the best safety shoes include a CSA certification and may include:

Safety-toe – features a special toe covering that protects the foot from dropped objects

Steel insole – stabilizes feet and protects them from joint and bone injuries or problems

Metal instep – provides a barrier against glass, nail and other sharp object punctures

Metatarsal protection – reduces injuries to your upper feet and internal bones

Electric protection – absorbs shock through specially made soles

Heat resistant – resists heat-related injuries

Water resistant – repels water and keeps feet dry  

Nonslip – improves traction on various surfaces

Where to Purchase Safety Footwear

Your employer may provide strict guidelines and limitations about exactly which safety shoe you may wear, including where you may purchase this gear. If you can select the safety shoes you wear, check specialty footwear stores or online retailers. Because you want to protect your feet, select only the right shoes for your job and feet. Price should be secondary as you promote safety.

How to Fit Your Safety Footwear

When trying on safety footwear, ensure a proper fit.

  • Try on shoes in the afternoon to accommodate swelling that occurs naturally during the day.
  • Wear your regular work socks and any special supports.
  • Ensure ample toe room since the shoes typically do not stretch with wear.
  • Check for snugness around the heel and ankle.
  • Walk around a bit to check for comfort.

Care Instructions

Most safety footwear requires ongoing care and maintenance. Before you wear them for the first time, apply a water-resistant coating. Every day, inspect your shoes for damage, including sole cracks, leather breaks or toe cap exposure. Always replace your safety footwear if you notice signs of wear or damage that you cannot repair and after a puncture, impact or other event that may compromise the shoe.

Protect your feet at work when you wear the right safety footwear. Talk to your employer and check OSHA resources as you purchase, maintain and wear shoes that protect your feet every day.

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1 year ago · by · 0 comments

Manufacturing Risk Management & Safety News

Executive Order on Apprenticeships Expected to Help Manufacturers

President Donald Trump recently signed an executive order that will expand apprenticeship programs across the country. As a result of the order, the number of available apprenticeships is expected to increase and the federal government will increase spending for apprenticeship programs to $200 million per year.

Many manufacturers use apprenticeships to meet employment requirements and help students get hands-on experience that can’t be achieved in a classroom. A larger emphasis on apprenticeships may also help fill an anticipated employee shortage in the manufacturing industry. According to the Manufacturing Institute, there will be 3.4 million manufacturing jobs to fill over the next 10 years.

Although the executive order didn’t set specific goals for the number of apprenticeships to be added, experts believe that up to 5 million apprenticeships could exist in the next 10 years. A clause included in the executive order may also allow existing internships to be categorized as apprenticeships.

Machining Safety Tips

Using machines is common for every manufacturer, but ignoring machining safety can expose you to incredibly high costs. OSHA issued $6.8 million in penalties for machining safety violations in 2015, and the associated costs of medical bills, damaged equipment and replacement personnel is much higher.

Before your employees use any machine, you should conduct a review to ensure that they’re properly trained and that all equipment is in working condition. Also, make sure that machine guards are in place to prevent injuries and that employees wear any required personal protective equipment. For more resources on machining safety, contact us at 831-661-5697 today.

Air Bag Manufacturer Files for Bankruptcy

Japanese auto part supplier Takata recently filed for bankruptcy after many years of managing the largest product recall in U.S. history. At least 16 deaths have been attributed to the company’s faulty air bag inflators, and over 69 million vehicles have been recalled as a result.

Although Takata recently pleaded guilty to a felony charge as part of an agreement with the Justice Department, mounting costs from the recall and associated lawsuits overwhelmed the manufacturer. However, Takata executives stated that filing for bankruptcy will allow them to reorganize their finances and continue shipping replacement parts for affected vehicles.

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Scurich Insurance Services
Phone: (831) 661-5697
Fax: (831) 661-5741

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783 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Suite7,
Aptos, Ca 95003-4700

Mailing:
PO Box 1170
Watsonville, CA 95077-1170

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(831) 661-5697

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